- President Calvin Coolidge, nicknamed "Silent Cal," was campaigning for re-election from his home state of Vermont, and his speech would be just as Republican today as it was then. He said the nation had to save money but also reduce taxes and he would oversee a government of common sense. Coolidge, by the way, was one of Ronald Reagen's political heroes.

- In Mount Carmel, one block from city hall, J. Forest Van Devender, a tobacco distributor, parked his truck at noon. He went inside a store to make a delivery, claimed he was gone just three minutes, and when he came out, he found thieves had made off with $100 worth of cigars. This was a headline story in those days - no one could believe thieves would act in broad daylight on a downtown streets. Van Devender was philosophical, however, saying the thieves really knew the tobacco business because they ignored all the stogies and went for the 25-cent ones, a really high price then.

- Speaking of price, gloves were five cents a pair at Gelb and Mayer at Independence and Liberty streets in Shamokin. Men's suits were $22 at the Woolen King on Independence Street. In Philadelphia's Posh Rittenhouse Hotel, you could get a room for $2 a night and a full-course dinner for $1.35. On the other side of the coin, a good salary was $75 a month.

- Prohibition was the law. You couldn't buy a legal alcoholic drink anywhere in the country, and politicians were complaining that bootleggers, sometimes called rum runners, were not only bringing in booze from foreign countries but also dope and illegal aliens.