- The weatherman of those days were calling for rain or snow, but that did not dampen Shamokin's enthusiasm over the news about the impending wedding of a local girl. In New York City, Helen Paul, of South Sixth Street, Shamokin, was set to marry a Kansas mining engineer named Frank Anderson. They were to be married in the famous little church around the corner, and then go to the foothills of the Andes in Colombia, where Frank Anderson was employed by a gold mining group.

- Young Louis Genoskie and the entire city of Shamokin expressed gratitude to Ted Kulp, who was a grade crossing watchman at a North Shamokin Street rail crossing. Young Genoskie, with the exuberance of youth, ran from the sample shoe store, where he worked, crossing the track without looking. Kulp screamed and waved at the engineer of the on-coming freight. The train was stopped inches away from Genoskie.

- The good-old days may not have been so good from the point of view of some segments of the community. For example, 20 members of the "Law and Order Society of Shamokin and Coal Township" were meeting with burgess of Shamokin, A.G. Shissler. They wanted to "improve the morals of the community" in regard to slot machines, young men in poolrooms and what they termed "glaring evils," including profanity in public. In 1924, it was against the law to curse in public, and people were urged to turn in violators.

- Traffic was starting to be a problem in Shamokin as more and more people got new "machines," as cars were called then. The state sent in a crew of troopers, and hundreds of area drivers were stopped and warned, but only 10 arrested for traffic violations.

- In Harrisburg, Gov. Gifford Pinchot announced the appointment of Northumberland County Republican Chairman Reese Jeremiah as a trustee on the Shamokin State Hospital board.

- In Rome, it was announced that Giacomo Puccini was dying. He was the composer of operas such as La Tosca, La Boheme and Madame Butterfly.