- Amid snow flurries, Coal Township Board President Torrance Spotts invited the public to an open house to view the new, modern township headquarters on West Wood Street. The building was the predecessor to the present facility on West Lynn Street.

- You could get out of Shamokin by bus in virtually any direction in 1961, and the cost was reasonable. For example, there was daily bus service to and from Harrisburg, with a one-way trip costing $2.65.

- In Milton, a peace organization calling itself the "Committee for Prayers Unlimited," with members from all major religions, sent a letter to President John F. Kennedy stating that the membership was conducting ongoing prayers for peace in the world.

- Pennsylvania Power and Light Co. contributed $1,000 to the Kulpmont Industrial Development Committee, of which Leonard Wydra was chairman.

- One of the most popular political figures of the day in the coal region, as well as many other parts of Pennsylvania, was state Secretary of Internal Affairs Genevieve Blatt, who was a judge. Gen, as she was affectionately called, drew a capacity crowd at St. Edward's in Shamokin at an altar rosary event.

- Medical authorities throughout the nation were shaking their heads in dismay when statistics showed that young men of draft age were being rejected at a rate of 60 percent because of physical defects. President Kennedy called for all Americans to take part in a fitness program.