- Shamokin borough council voted down a proposal that was similar to many in other cities in the United States in the late 1930s and '40s: the installation of parking meters. The proposal called for 500 of the coin-eaters. When council voted the idea down, citizens thought the project was finished for good.

- Karl Hoffman, who at the time was an executive with a Shenandoah newspaper, was also chairman of a survey committee that was looking at the possibility of a tunnel to drain flooded mines in Northumberland and Schuylkill counties. Hoffman, who later would become one of the best-known newspapermen in Shamokin history, said every aspect of the project would come under his committee's surveillance.

- Although the United States wasn't in it yet, World War II was well over six months old, and Adolf Hitler's forces had rolled over most of Europe with unimaginable ease. Norway was the latest victim, with Romania thought to be next on the Nazi list. Hitler would eventually conquer virtually all of Europe before he was stopped.

- In England, Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, who would go down in history as the "Great Appeaser" because he thought he could deal with Hitler, made the best move of his political career when he turned control of Britain's armed forces over to an aggressive, round little man who smoked big cigars. The man's name was Winston Churchill.