- The main topic of conversation was the iron nerve of local pilot Albert Carl. Airplanes were still an object of wonderment in the late 1920s, and Carl was flying an exhibition between the Minersville and Pottsville areas. The exhibition had been well promoted and more than 3,000 people were in the crowd watching Carl's plane. Suddenly, engine trouble developed and Carl was faced with a tough choice: put the plane down in the only clear area - all of which was covered with people - or try to land outside the perimeter of the crowd, which meant hitting trees. Carl chose not to go for the trees. All three people in his plane were hurt, but not seriously. No one in the crowd was injured at all.

- Three young men from Shamokin were in the process of making a cross-country trip by car. While that might not seem like much today, it was really an unusual undertaking then. The young men were headed, generally, for the Pacific Ocean.

- No less a personage than Dr. Alfred Goldsmith of RCA was trying to contact with intelligent beings from Mars. Goldsmith said if there were such beings, one thing they would understand was geometry, and so he was transmitting radio signals, geometric in structure, to Mars. As of yet, there has been no response.

- At the Victoria, it was Ronald Colman, who would become a star in talking movies, in "Night of Love," with Vilma Banky, who would not make the transition from "silents" to "talkies."