- In a political move that surprised many observers, the Shamokin school board named city Treasurer George Edwards to administer the newly imposed school tax program.

- With the Fourth of July holiday in the offing, Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission Chairman Joseph Lawler said cars would be inspected at toll booths on the pike and that vehicles found to be defective in such areas as wipers, brakes, turn signals and the like would be barred from using the road.

- Shamokin Chief of Police George Haddock said there had been no serious accidents over the Memorial Day weekend, but that area motorists should not be complacent over that good record because more visitors were expected over the Fourth than had come in May.

- A new twist in driving safety would have its first tryout in Pennsylvania over the 1960 Fourth of July holiday. It was to be set up on Route 30 between Gettysburg, and Philadelphia and motorists would take to it about as well as a duck swims in molasses. It was called radar detection.

- Knoebels Grove was bustling with activity as usual, and local kids were delighted with the main attraction at the bandshell. He was a puppet who the little kids of 1960 thought would be as immortal as Howdy Doody or Lambchop or Charlie McCarthy. History, however, was not as kind to this puppet, whose name has been long forgotten, except by fanatic fans. He was Bertie the Bunyip.