- A.J. McBride, chief of the Highways Department for Northumberland County, announced that county road crews would no longer clear dirt roads. The reason, said McBride, was that rutted dirt roads were murder on plow blades and could snap them off like crackers. He added that if there were an emergency such as imminent birth or a life-threatening situation requiring immediate medical attention, such roads would be plowed.

- Charles Malick was named president of the Shamokin School Board.

- Representatives from companies and union locals throughout the hard-coal district were in Philadelphia attending a city council meeting. They were there to protest a plan by which natural gas would be pipelined into Philadelphia from western Pennsylvania, which would lead, they feared, to a highly curtailed market for coal.

- Miners in the Shamokin area were delighted to hear the outcome of this story as they always were by miner stories that had happy endings. In Pinckneyville, Ill., Lawrence Lee, a 28-year-old soft-coal miner, had been missing for two days and was feared dead. On this day, Lee walked out of a mine exit that had not been used for years, one about which even veteran miners had forgotten. He said he had been lost and had wandered through a maze of little used passages until he found the exit.

- Many area people were planning a trip to Pottsville, where the Reading Line's newest train, the Streamliner, was on display. The train had drawn more than 30,000 people in Philadelphia. It was the last word in luxury and speed, not dissimilar to today's Amtrak trains.