- A serious case of unrest was reported at a mine near Bear Valley No. 2. The coal company had brought in power equipment to strip-mine the site, and some 500 to 700 independent miners were furious at the decision. There were open threats to blow up the power machines, and the state police were called in to maintain order.

- Despite the real possibility of war in America's future, it was obvious to most that the heyday of hard coal was over. To point up that truth, it was virtually unbelievable to most people in the Shamokin area that the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Co. was filing for bankruptcy. In Philadelphia, special examiner Nicholas Roosevelt said the once-proud giant of the industry was now insolvent, and that its $95 million in stock should be declared of no value.

- In New York, a man named Lawrence Frank announced what was then a totally new concept for the elderly. Frank said he would like to build what he called "neat little villages," mainly in southern states, for people over the age of 65. He said the little towns would have no schools, but would have golf courses, libraries, social centers and single-story homes.

- In Shamokin, professor Llewellyn Edwards of Schuylkill Haven was named the new director of the Community Choral Club. Edwards came in with impressive credentials. He graduated from the University of Chicago and the Royal Academy of Music in London.